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The harvest begins!

I spent a great day with my mom and sister canning food. We made salsa with tomatoes and onions from my garden, and threw in some amazing serrano and pablano peppers from a local farmer’s market. We also pickled cukes and canned some peaches, all locally and sustainably grown. It’s incredibly satisfying looking at what we produced, and it’s great knowing where it all came from and how it was grown. Support your local growers when and if you can!

For those following my series of Rune affirmations, I’ll be back with Day 5, Raido by the end of the day on Saturday the 22nd.

 

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Just for now…stop, breathe, and listen.

Today’s affirmation comes from the fourth rune of the first aett (or “family”) of the Elder FutharkAnsuz. Its traditional meaning comes from the Rune Poems, the oldest of which translates as follows:

The Mouth is the source of every speech,
The mainstay of wisdom,
And solace of sages,
And the happiness and hope of every eorl.

–The Anglo-Saxon rune poem, Verse IV

“The Mouth” in the first stanza as often interpreted as the Divine. In the Northern Tradition this is either the god Odin or Loki, depending on how the rune falls (upright or reversed, respectively). However the Divine has many faces and names, and means different things to different people. For example I see “The Mouth” as my own inner knowing – that part in each of us that answers with a soft but clear whisper when asked, “What now?”

Think for a moment about how much of your day you spend in constant motion, chasing tasks and giving your valuable time to anyone who asks for it. “Most of the day” is probably your answer, and almost everyone else would say the same. Now honestly consider how many of these tasks and meetings leave you with a greater feeling of peace, freedom, and joy once completed. “Not many” is probably your answer, and again many would echo this.

What if, even once today, you stopped what you were doing and asked yourself, “Does what I’m doing now contribute to my highest good?” Then take a deep breath, go within, and listen for the answer. If you don’t receive the answer right away, don’t worry…just keep pausing, breathing, asking, and listening. With practice you will receive the guidance you need.

Ansuz affirmation:

I am aware of my innermost self. It guides and directs me.

A note about this affirmation: if the words presented don’t ring true for you, change them! Make it something that feels good and reflects who you are. For example, some may want to replace “innermost self” above with the name by which they address their Higher Power (God, Goddess, Buddha, etc.). The words don’t do the work on their own…it’s words + repetition + personal intent and emotional connection that make affirmations such powerful catalysts for positive growth.

Click here to see other affirmations in this series.

Rune source material: Oswald the Runemaker

Affirmation by Orin and Sanaya Roman

I’ve been a runology student for 20 years. See the About page or click here to learn more about my work with the runes.

I just read a fascinating story in the New York Times discussing the possibility that Jesus was married based on the probable authenticity of a recently uncovered papyrus.

If this is true, what does it mean? Why is the possibility that Jesus wasn’t celibate so threatening to some of the article’s detractors? (Some immediately dismiss it; others assert that “wife” simply means “the Church?”.)

Edit: moments after posting this, the story mysteriously disappeared from the NYT blog. I’ve changed the first link above to point to a similar story at NPR.

Today’s affirmation comes from the third rune of the first aett (or “family”) in the Elder FutharkThurisaz. Its traditional meaning comes from the Rune Poems, the oldest of which translates as follows:

The Thorn is sorely sharp for any thane
Hurtful to hold
Uncommonly severe
To every man who lies among them.

–The Anglo-Saxon rune poem, Verse III

In the mid-70’s author Michael Crichton wrote a book called The Eaters of the Dead based on the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf. In 1999 it was made into a movie starring Antonio Banderas and Omar Sharif. Though an abysmal failure at the box office, the movie remains one of my favorites. A line from the film stuck with me, one I feel succinctly conveys the meaning of Thurisaz: “Fear profits a man nothing.”

At a deeper level, this rune speaks to the power of anger as a catalyst for positive change…a “thorn” we can use to cut ourselves free from relationships and circumstances that don’t empower us. However it also speaks to the danger in holding on to anger after it has served its purpose. I think it’s safe to say we’ve all personally experienced (and observed in others) the damaging effects of anger that stays around longer than it should.

Yet another facet of Thurisaz is a warning to be cautious of temptation. To put it another way, be cautious of thorns when you reach out to pluck that ripe, sweet berry from the vine.

And so the affirmation for Thurisaz is,

Today I choose peace, and release fear. I trust in my innermost self to give all the guidance and strength I need.

A note about this affirmation (and any written by someone other than yourself): if the words presented don’t ring true for you, feel free to change them. Make the affirmation something that feels good to you. For example, some may want to replace “innermost self” above with the name by which they address their Higher Power (God, Goddess, Buddha, etc.). The words don’t do the work on their own…it’s words + repetition + personal intent and emotional connection that make affirmations such powerful catalysts for positive growth. Make the affirmation your own!

Click here to see other affirmations in this series.

Affirmations inspired by Orin and Sanaya Roman

Source material: Oswald the Runemaker

I’ve been a runology student for 20 years. See the About page or click here to learn more about my work with the runes.

People usually consider walking on water or in thin air a miracle. But I think the real miracle is not to walk either on water or in thin air, but to walk on earth. Every day we are engaged in a miracle which we don’t even recognize: a blue sky, white clouds, green leaves, the black, curious eyes of a child — our own two eyes. All is a miracle.

Thich Nhat Hanh

Today’s affirmation comes from the second rune of the first aett (or “family”) in the Elder FutharkUruz. Its traditional meaning comes from the Rune Poems, the oldest of which translates as follows:

The Aurochs is fearless and huge of horn
A ferocious beast, it fights with its horns
A famous moor-stalker that:
A spirited beast.

–The Anglo-Saxon rune poem, Verse II

Now extinct, the aurochs was a large and aggressive breed of ox present in northern Europe until the early 1600’s. The hunter who killed one was regarded as having great courage and fortitude, and aurochs horns were coveted trophies often used as drinking vessels, displaying the owner’s prowess for all to see.

Few would argue that it can take the strength and will of an ox to stay focused, centered, and balanced as we try to navigate the ever-changing landscape of daily life. Many of us continually encounter people and situations that threaten to knock us off our gait by pulling us out of a peaceful center.

The simple but powerful wisdom of this rune is that the actions of others and the circumstances we face can only upset us if we allow it. It counsels being the hunter, and not the hunted; being proactive instead of reactive. A successful hunter remains calm, confident, and focused regardless of how the landscape changes or how the quarry reacts. The hunted however is completely reactive, and can become agitated and aggressive in response to the hunter (everyday circumstances).

Every day I “hunt” for peace and balance, and aim to stay centered and focused regardless of who or what I come across.

And so the affirmation for Uruz is,

I remain peaceful and compassionate even when those around me are not. I stay centered and balanced regardless of what the day brings.

Click here to see other affirmations in this series.

Affirmations inspired by Orin and Sanaya Roman

Source material: Oswald the Runemaker

I’ve been a runology student for 20 years. See the About page or click here to learn more about my work with the runes.

After waking but while still in bed this morning, I had the idea to create a series of 24 affirmations based on each rune of the Elder Futhark. With a new moon last night, it’s the perfect time to begin a new cycle.

Today, Fehu…the first rune of the first aett (or “family”) in the Elder Futhark. Fehu’s traditional meaning comes from the Rune Poems, the oldest of which translates as follows:

Wealth is a consolation to all men
Yet much of it must each man give away
If glory he desire
To gain before his god.

–The Anglo-Saxon rune poem, Verse I

What is this poem saying? From my perspective it says that although wealth enables a certain level of comfort, believing “there’s never enough” is a certain path to unhappiness. In short it’s saying, “You can’t take it with you.” However by believing there’s enough for us and everyone else, we release ourselves from the consciousness of scarcity and open to receiving even more spiritual and material wealth.

This wisdom has popped up in many other places since the original poem was written ~1300 years ago. Probably its most recent incarnation is in the trendy, new age pop psychology book/movie The Secret. Though I was never a fan of the enterprise and hype surrounding The Secret, (its central message is not new or revolutionary; Louise Hay has written about the law of attraction since the mid-70’s), the truth is the truth. If the masses need Oprah’s stamp of approval and sexy marketing to buy in, so be it!

And so today I affirm the wisdom offered by Fehu:

I always have all I need, and joyfully share with those around me.

Click here to see other affirmations in this series.

Affirmations inspired by Orin and Sanaya Roman

Source material: Oswald the Runemaker

I’ve been a runology student for 20 years. See the About page or click here to learn more about my work with the runes.

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